Health

Does the Covid-19 vaccine affect a woman’s menstrual cycle

Following their shots, some women have reported irregular periods or other menstrual changes. The National Institutes of Health is funding research to see if there is a link between the two.

One of the first studies to look into how the Covid-19 vaccine might affect women’s periods discovered a small but noticeable difference.

According to a study published on Wednesday, nearly 4,000 US women were followed for six menstrual cycles and found that the next period after a shot began about a day later than usual. However, the number of days of menstrual bleeding did not change after Covid-19 vaccination.

“This is incredibly reassuring,” said Dr. Alison Edelman of Oregon Health & Science University, who led the study and believes it is critical to inform women about their options.

Following their shots, some women have reported irregular periods or other menstrual changes. The National Institutes of Health is funding research to see if there is a link between the two.

The data was analysed by Edelman’s team from Natural Cycles, a birth control app that was approved by the Food and Drug Administration to help women track their menstrual cycles and predict when they’re most likely to become pregnant.

menstrual cycle
menstrual cycle

Menstrual cycles are measured from one period’s first day to the next’s first day. Month-to-month variations are normal, and stress, diet, and even exercise can cause temporary changes.

Women in the study had “the most normal of normal” cycle lengths, ranging from 24 to 38 days, according to Edelman. The researchers compared vaccinated women to unvaccinated women for three cycles before the shots and three cycles afterward, including the months they received a dose. Women were prompted to enter vaccine information in the app.

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A subset of 358 women who received both vaccine doses during the same menstrual cycle experienced a two-day increase in the length of their next cycle. The researchers reported in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology that about 10% of them had a change of eight days or more before returning to normal ranges.

According to Edelman, “our body clock or what controls the menstrual cycle can have a hiccup” when the immune system ramps up at certain times during the cycle.

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She plans to conduct more research to see if the heaviness of menstrual bleeding changes or if women with irregular periods react differently.

According to Dr. Christopher Zahn of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the findings provide “important new evidence underscoring that any impact of the Covid vaccines on menstruation is both minimal and temporary.”

READ ALSO: It now exceeds 1 lakh Covids per day, and Omicrons 3,000

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